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first_imgBy Kris LeonhardtEditorMARSHFIELD — Major League Baseball pitcher Jordan Zimmermann was inducted into the Marshfield Area Baseball and Softball Hall of Fame class of 2017 along with five local standouts during a ceremony held at the Marshfield Eagles Club Jan. 28.The induction ceremony honored one softball and three baseball players as well as two individuals for their dedication to area programs.Zimmermann grew up in Auburndale, where he played four years on the varsity team. He attended the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point before being drafted by the Washington Nationals. Zimmermann currently pitches for the Detroit Tigers.Other athletes inducted to the class of 2017include Dave A. Hinker, Greenwood, men’s softball; Jim Parmalee, Marshfield, men’s baseball; and Ed Haumschild, Auburndale, men’s baseball.Two local supporters were also recognized for their efforts to community programs. Marlyn Laabs, Marshfield, received the Bob Holubets Memorial Award, and Marvin Kohlbeck, Pittsville, was presented with the Lifetime Recognition Award.last_img read more

first_imgThe fingerprint scanner. Source: Delta. A two-finger biometric salute can now get Delta Air Lines customers into 50 Sky Club locations across the US.Delta Sky Club members who are US citizens or permanent residents can use CLEAR biometric fingerprint readers to check in across the domestic network, side-stepping the need to have a paper or mobile boarding pass or a club membership card.They need to enroll by registering at a CLEAR enrolment kiosk in one of 14 Delta Sky Club locations across the country.They will then be able to check in to all clubs by placing two fingers on a fingerprint reader.Delta has been testing biometrics at a number of locations over the past year, including at Sky Clubs at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., and its home hub in Atlanta.It has also been looking at biometric technology for boarding at DCA and bag drop at Minneapolis-St Paul. Its relationship with CLEAR stretches back to 2016.The airline says it is the only US-based global airline to offer customers a secure biometric check-in option at a single touch point across its network.“From unlocking our phones to entering the workplace, more and more people have the option to use biometrics as a form of identity verification for daily activities,” Delta’s chief operating officer Gil West said in announcing the Sky Club roll-out.“Having that option is quickly becoming an expectation that we are working hard to meet through this program.”The Sky Club readers feature a redesign that includes ergonomic fingerprint support and an angled fingerprint scanner to optimize the hand angle and promote successful scans.There is also an intuitive sound and lighting check-in response to help both customers and staff.The changes were made after customer feedback during the testing phase.The aviation industry is increasingly looking biometrics as a way of making check-in more secure as well as speed up the process and address bottlenecks in areas such as border security.Facial recognition is another technology that is gaining ground with JetBlue and British Airways among the airlines using a passenger’s unique facial features to identify them.READ British Airways uses biometrics to speed boarding.last_img read more

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market,Apple revolutionizes stuff. It’s practically conventional wisdom in the tech world that, even if they’re not first in the game or necessarily even the best, the Cupertino-based giant has a tendency to make a noticeable impact. They didn’t invent the MP3 player, smartphone or tablet, but they sure have redefined all of those products. Even if this tendency is strong, it’s not necessarily always how things play out. For an example, look no further than the Apple TV. Today, the company set their sights on textbooks, an industry Steve Jobs himself described as being “ripe for digital destruction.” True as that may be, is what Apple planning to do in the space really all that disruptive? There’s no doubt that giving authors dead simple tools for publishing their own interactive e-books is a big deal. As Nieman Journalism Lab’s Joshua Benton so effectively outlined earlier this week, creating a “Garage Band for e-books” could do to book publishing what the advent of the blogging platform did for short-form self-publishing on the Web. And it’s also true that the immersive, interactive experience of learning from the kinds of digital textbooks Apple demoed today has far more potential than print ever did. If the company’s efforts are going to help revolutionize textbooks and education, it’s going to be some time before that happens, and they’re not going to do it alone. Costly and Not Cross-Platform Apple released the second version of its iBooks app for iOS today, which includes access to the new textbook titles. One thing the company did not announce is that the app is coming to other platforms. Granted, the iPad is still the leader of the tablet market, but Android is slowly catching up and Amazon just released a device geared toward content consumption that costs less than half of the entry level iPad. And it’s growing fast. Of course, Apple ultimately wants to sell more of its hardware, but if it really wants its textbook initiative to truly take off, it will have to develop apps for other platforms, just as Amazon has done with its Kindle apps.Another barrier to widespread adoption of this model is the cost of the iPad. It starts at $500, which is not something every American family can afford, especially with an economy in flux. With hundreds of “pages” of content, 3D interactive graphics, embedded video and other bells and whistles, we have to imagine these books aren’t particularly light on file size. As the books accumulate over time, alongside other content stored on the iPad, the 16 GB entry level model may no longer cut it, making it an even more expensive investment. Not Aimed at the College Market (and Did We Mention the iPad is Expensive?) The cost issue might be mitigated somewhat if the initiative were not targeted exclusively at high school students. At least for the time being, Apple’s digital textbooks are targeted primarily at high school students. That fact alone presents a few roadblocks to the initiative being truly disruptive. For one, not every high school student in the United States can afford a $500 tablet device. Apple may well end up dropping the price when they launch the iPad 3 in a few weeks, but even then we’re probably still talking about a several-hundred-dollar gadget. Many middle and upper class families can afford that, but kids in inner city schools and other low-income areas, some of which can barely afford enough paper textbooks, aren’t going to be learning from iPads anytime soon. For college students, investing in an iPad or similar device to replace textbooks makes simple economic sense. A single semester’s worth of textbooks can easily approach the cost of an iPad. If the e-books available on the device are drastically less expensive than their paper counterparts, it would be foolish not to make the digital switch. Of course, how dramatically prices would drop remains to be seen. Apple is Partnering With Big Publishers, Not Killing ThemCollege textbooks are enormously, obscenely profitable for the the companies that print them. In fact, they’ve come up with all kinds of creative ways of milking more money out of students. Textbooks about ancient history will be revised and re-issued every other semester and the company will package supplementary CD-ROM’s and other digital learning materials, using them as a justification to jack up the price. To get its new initiative off the ground, Apple is partnering with major publishers like McGraw Hill, Pearson and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. For the high school market, perhaps those companies can afford to agree to a $15-per-book price tag. But when it comes to higher education, publishers are unlikely to allow a $180 biology print textbook be replaced with a $15 e-book. That would cut into their profits pretty dramatically. At the same time, interactive e-textbooks can’t be resold once they’re used, so perhaps the publishers can be convinced that their e-book revenues will be replenished on a semesterly basis without fail. Interestingly, at the same time that Apple has unveiled major partnerships with textbooks publishers, it also unleashed what appears to be a powerful, easy-to-use publishing toolkit for producing those books. If independent authors manage to create enough competition, it’s possible that bigger publishers will have no choice but to play ball with Apple’s preferred pricing for textbooks. Apple’s Not the Only Player There’s little reason to doubt that a decade from now, the classroom and the tools in it will look very different from what students are accustomed to today. The textbook is indeed one of the educational tools that is most in need of a digital makeover. When paper textbooks are finally a thing of the past, it won’t have been Apple’s efforts alone that got us there. For one, education is already being blown wide open by the Web. The mere concepts of “the lecture” and “the textbook” begin to look antiquated in light of things like Khan Academy, Wikipedia, Wolfram Alpha, iTunes U and MIT’s Open Courseware. Those examples are just the tip of the iceberg. You’d be hard-pressed to find a student in the U.S. today that isn’t already using the Internet to supplement their educational experience to some extent. Apple is well aware of the changes that are already underway. That’s why they’re doing this. That’s why their DIY publishing tools include the ability pull in pieces of the Web and incorporate HTML5 and JavaScript. Apple is also not the first company to try to re-imagine the textbook for a digital world. The so-called “smartbooks” offered by e-textbook startup Inking are in some ways more advanced than what Apple is bringing to the table. Other companies already active in this space include Chegg and Kno, as Audrey Watters points out on Hack Education. Indeed, Apple is anything but the first entrant into this space. Not that that’s stopped them in the past. Lead textbook photo by Stephen Cummings. Phil Schiller photo courtesy of The Verge. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Apple#E-Books#E-Learning#web Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Apple#E-Books#E-Learning#web john paul titlow Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Apple revolutionizes stuff. It’s practically conventional wisdom in the tech world that, even if they’re not first in the game or necessarily even the best, the Cupertino-based giant has a tendency to make a noticeable impact. They didn’t invent the MP3 player, smartphone or tablet, but they sure have redefined all of those products. Even if this tendency is strong, it’s not necessarily always how things play out. For an example, look no further than the Apple TV. Today, the company set their sights on textbooks, an industry Steve Jobs himself described as being “ripe for digital destruction.” True as that may be, is what Apple planning to do in the space really all that disruptive? There’s no doubt that giving authors dead simple tools for publishing their own interactive e-books is a big deal. As Nieman Journalism Lab’s Joshua Benton so effectively outlined earlier this week, creating a “Garage Band for e-books” could do to book publishing what the advent of the blogging platform did for short-form self-publishing on the Web. And it’s also true that the immersive, interactive experience of learning from the kinds of digital textbooks Apple demoed today has far more potential than print ever did. If the company’s efforts are going to help revolutionize textbooks and education, it’s going to be some time before that happens, and they’re not going to do it alone. Costly and Not Cross-Platform Apple released the second version of its iBooks app for iOS today, which includes access to the new textbook titles. One thing the company did not announce is that the app is coming to other platforms. Granted, the iPad is still the leader of the tablet market, but Android is slowly catching up and Amazon just released a device geared toward content consumption that costs less than half of the entry level iPad. And it’s growing fast. Of course, Apple ultimately wants to sell more of its hardware, but if it really wants its textbook initiative to truly take off, it will have to develop apps for other platforms, just as Amazon has done with its Kindle apps.Another barrier to widespread adoption of this model is the cost of the iPad. It starts at $500, which is not something every American family can afford, especially with an economy in flux. With hundreds of “pages” of content, 3D interactive graphics, embedded video and other bells and whistles, we have to imagine these books aren’t particularly light on file size. As the books accumulate over time, alongside other content stored on the iPad, the 16 GB entry level model may no longer cut it, making it an even more expensive investment. Not Aimed at the College Market (and Did We Mention the iPad is Expensive?) The cost issue might be mitigated somewhat if the initiative were not targeted exclusively at high school students. At least for the time being, Apple’s digital textbooks are targeted primarily at high school students. That fact alone presents a few roadblocks to the initiative being truly disruptive. For one, not every high school student in the United States can afford a $500 tablet device. Apple may well end up dropping the price when they launch the iPad 3 in a few weeks, but even then we’re probably still talking about a several-hundred-dollar gadget. Many middle and upper class families can afford that, but kids in inner city schools and other low-income areas, some of which can barely afford enough paper textbooks, aren’t going to be learning from iPads anytime soon. For college students, investing in an iPad or similar device to replace textbooks makes simple economic sense. A single semester’s worth of textbooks can easily approach the cost of an iPad. If the e-books available on the device are drastically less expensive than their paper counterparts, it would be foolish not to make the digital switch. Of course, how dramatically prices would drop remains to be seen. Apple is Partnering With Big Publishers, Not Killing ThemCollege textbooks are enormously, obscenely profitable for the the companies that print them. In fact, they’ve come up with all kinds of creative ways of milking more money out of students. Textbooks about ancient history will be revised and re-issued every other semester and the company will package supplementary CD-ROM’s and other digital learning materials, using them as a justification to jack up the price. To get its new initiative off the ground, Apple is partnering with major publishers like McGraw Hill, Pearson and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. For the high school market, perhaps those companies can afford to agree to a $15-per-book price tag. But when it comes to higher education, publishers are unlikely to allow a $180 biology print textbook be replaced with a $15 e-book. That would cut into their profits pretty dramatically. At the same time, interactive e-textbooks can’t be resold once they’re used, so perhaps the publishers can be convinced that their e-book revenues will be replenished on a semesterly basis without fail. Interestingly, at the same time that Apple has unveiled major partnerships with textbooks publishers, it also unleashed what appears to be a powerful, easy-to-use publishing toolkit for producing those books. If independent authors manage to create enough competition, it’s possible that bigger publishers will have no choice but to play ball with Apple’s preferred pricing for textbooks. Apple’s Not the Only Player There’s little reason to doubt that a decade from now, the classroom and the tools in it will look very different from what students are accustomed to today. The textbook is indeed one of the educational tools that is most in need of a digital makeover. When paper textbooks are finally a thing of the past, it won’t have been Apple’s efforts alone that got us there. For one, education is already being blown wide open by the Web. The mere concepts of “the lecture” and “the textbook” begin to look antiquated in light of things like Khan Academy, Wikipedia, Wolfram Alpha, iTunes U and MIT’s Open Courseware. Those examples are just the tip of the iceberg. You’d be hard-pressed to find a student in the U.S. today that isn’t already using the Internet to supplement their educational experience to some extent. Apple is well aware of the changes that are already underway. That’s why they’re doing this. That’s why their DIY publishing tools include the ability pull in pieces of the Web and incorporate HTML5 and JavaScript. Apple is also not the first company to try to re-imagine the textbook for a digital world. The so-called “smartbooks” offered by e-textbook startup Inking are in some ways more advanced than what Apple is bringing to the table. Other companies already active in this space include Chegg and Kno, as Audrey Watters points out on Hack Education. Indeed, Apple is anything but the first entrant into this space. Not that that’s stopped them in the past. Lead textbook photo by Stephen Cummings. Phil Schiller photo courtesy of The Verge. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… john paul titlowlast_img read more

first_img By Jake BuehlerMar. 29, 2019 , 12:50 PM Human noise may be scrambling the eggs of baby fish Ethan Daniels/Alamy Stock Photo center_img Whether it’s cargo ships, oil rigs, or sonar, humans make a lot of noise in the ocean. This cacophony can disorient fish and make them more vulnerable to predators. Now, for the first time, researchers have revealed that noise pollution can meddle with these sea creatures even before they hatch.The team focused on two species of damselfish common on Australian coral reefs: spiny chromis (Acanthochromis polyacanthus) and the red and black anemonefish (Amphiprion melanopus, pictured). Both are fairly easy to rear in the lab and they differ in the ways their embryos develop. In the lab, the researchers watched the offspring of these fish mature under audio recordings of either ambient reef sounds, or reef sounds with motorboats passing overhead every 5 minutes. They monitored the embryos’ heart rates, yolk sizes, and physical characteristics.Undersea din can warp baby reef fish development, the team reports this month in Marine Pollution Bulletin. The embryo hearts of both fish beat 10% faster when boat noise was played, and the spiny chromises exposed to the racket hatched about 5% larger than those under ambient noise; their eyes were also about 9% larger.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The researchers think the stress produced by boat noise may boost embryo metabolism, draining yolk energy reserves and forcing the embryos to grow faster. Indeed, chromises reared with boat noise had yolks 13% smaller than their ambient counterparts at hatch time. Smaller yolks may mean less energy available to newly hatched, growing larvae.The scientists say it’s still not clear whether any of these changes are detrimental to the fish. If they are, they say, noise pollution may be having an even more insidious impact than previously believed.last_img read more

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 8, 2010November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The following is part of a series of project updates from Future Generations.  MHTF is supporting their project, Using Pregnancy Histories to Help Mothers, based in Peru. More information on MHTF supported projects can be found here. All photos courtesy of Laura Altobelli.Written by: Future GenerationsWe have our office and staff quarters up and running in the rural town of Urcos, about one hour south of the city of Cusco. Being home to one of the seven wonders of the world, Macchu Pichu, the city of Cusco has a multi-million dollar tourist industry but, paradoxically, in its rural areas among the highest rates of maternal and perinatal mortality in the country. One understands this when visiting our 28 project communities, divided into 62 sectors and annexes, which require a one, two or more-hour drive (or two to six-hour walk on foot) on rutty dirt roads through the Andes, there and back from the major towns of Urcos or Quiquijana on the main paved road through the river valley. Public transportation runs only on Sundays from communities. Not surprising that mothers are tempted to give birth at home or to delay seeking care for a sick newborn or infant when faced with that long walk.We selected the “highland communities” for our intervention since that is where the need is, where women and families tend to live in scattered homesteads with limited and pyramidal social organization. We have been pleased at the very positive response from community leaders and husbands to the idea that Women Leaders will be trained to teach women in their community.Community health promoters who have received training in the past have mostly been men. One told us, “How good that women will be trained: they are shy and need to be more active.”  One woman, not so shy, who was chosen by other women in her community to receive training from the project as a Women Leader told everyone, “Now it will be a rule that every time we meet to pick up food [from a government food distribution program for children] I will make you stay to get a talk on health.”  In another community, the men joked that they will be fine while the selected Women Leaders are away at training since they cook better than the women.  At that, everyone laughed heartily.Share this:last_img read more

first_imgShares of Hydropothecary Corp. rose more than 18 per cent after the licensed medical cannabis producer announced ambitious plans that will see it further grow its operations in Quebec at a rapid pace.The company (TSXV:THCX) said Tuesday it has acquired property adjacent to its existing facility in Gatineau, Que., to construct a new 93,000-square-metre greenhouse that would increase its production capacity to 108,000 kilograms of dried cannabis per year.The expansion will bring the company’s total production capacity to about 121,000 sq. m of cultivation and manufacturing labs, with the expansion expected to be completed in one year.“Hydropothecary is boldly stepping forward to take the lead in the Canadian cannabis industry… Once legalization and the adult-use recreational market become a reality, Hydropothecary will be ready,” said Sebastien St. Louis, CEO and co-founder, in a statement.Vahan Ajamian, a research analyst with Beacon Securities Ltd., said the expansion would put Hydropothecary among the top three producers in Canada.By comparison, Ontario-headquartered Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED) announced in October that it will develop up to about 280,000 sq. metres of greenhouse growing capacity in British Columbia, more than doubling the production footprint of Canada’s biggest licensed marijuana producer.Hydropothecary currently has a production capacity of about 4,600 sq. m and produces about 3,600 kg of dried cannabis per year. An expansion announced in October will see the company increase its production capacity by about 23,000 sq. m by next July, after which it said it’s expected to produce about 26,000 kg annually.St. Louis said costs for the newest expansion to be completed next December, which are expected to be $80 million, will be funded through the company’s current financial resources.The addition is expected to create up to 100 jobs during construction, with another 100 positions forecast for the operation of the new facility.This is on top of 100 jobs which will be created when the company’s 23,000 sq. m greenhouse expansion, which is expected to cost $25 million, becomes operational in July.Shares of Hydropothecary closed at $4.11, up 63 cents or 18.10 per cent, on the TSX Venture Exchange.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgBEIJING — The U.S. government has accused Beijing of stepping up hacking attacks aimed at stealing American technology ahead of a meeting between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping.Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in a report that Chinese hacking efforts aimed at stealing American trade secrets have “increased in frequency and sophistication” this year.The report reflects U.S. skepticism before the meeting, to be held during a gathering of the Group of 20 major economies in Buenos Aires.The two sides have raised import duties on billions of dollars of each other’s goods in a fight over U.S. complaints that Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology.The Associated Presslast_img read more

first_imgAlberta’s Opposition Leader Jason Kenney said the federal judges who overturned approval for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are out of touch with the real world.He said Notley has not helped matters by prematurely celebrating the construction of the pipeline while imposing a carbon tax in the mistaken belief it would provide so-called “social licence” that would persuade environmental opponents to stand down.The Trans Mountain line has dominated Alberta politics in the last year and it, along with everything it represents, including Alberta’s carbon tax, is expected to overshadow all other issues in a spring election.Notley has said Alberta’s commitment to environmental stewardship, expressed through its carbon tax and commitment to phase out coal-fired electricity along with other green initiatives, allowed Trudeau’s government to follow through on its commitment to get the pipeline built. “This ruling is bad for working families and it is bad for the security of our country, the economic security of our country,” Notley told a news conference Thursday.“It is a crisis.”Notley called on the federal government to immediately appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court of Canada. She said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau must also call an emergency session of Parliament to fix the process so that the pipeline can be built.Until that happens, Notley said the province will remain outside the federal climate plan.“Let’s be clear, without Alberta, that plan isn’t worth the paper it’s written on,” she said.The federal government has said it is reviewing the court decision and plans on pushing forward with the project. To that end, the federal government bought the project for $4.5 billion when owner Kinder Morgan Canada wavered this spring.The pipeline is also a financial lifeline for Notley’s government, which has been running multibillion-dollar deficits while avoiding introducing a sales tax or making significant cuts to the budget.The province has budgeted for increased pipeline access to drive non-renewable resource revenue to more than double to $10.4 billion by 2024 to balance the budget.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)center_img EDMONTON, A.B. – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says she’s pulling the province out of the federal climate change plan.The move comes after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed the approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would have doubled the line from Edmonton to the B.C. coast and tripled the amount of oil shipped to fetch a better price on overseas markets.The panel of three judges cited a lack of consultation with Indigenous groups and a failure to address the impact of increased tanker traffic on the endangered southern resident killer whale population off the coast of B.C.last_img read more

first_imgJammu: Pakistani troops Sunday resorted to unprovoked ceasefire violations targeting forward posts and villages at four places along the Line of Control (LoC) in Jammu and Kashmir’s Poonch district, officials said.The firing was intense in the Krishna Ghati sector, where the Pakistani troops resorted to mortar shelling and firing by small arms from around 04.30 AM, which was retaliated to befittingly by the Indian Army, a defence spokesman said. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!He said the cross-border shelling between the two sides continued till 07.30 AM. There was no report of any casualty on the Indian side, he said.Officials said firing and shelling by Pakistan were also reported from the Balnoi and Mankote (both in Mendhar sector), besides from Shahpur sector, all in Poonch district, for a brief period in the early hours of Sunday.The firing was mild in nature and lasted for a brief period without causing any harm, they said. Also Read – Encounter under way in Pulwama, militant killedOn late Saturday as well, the Pakistan army had targeted Indian positions In Sunderbani sector of Rajouri district for several hours.There has been a spurt in ceasefire violations by Pakistan after India’s preemptive air strike on a Jaish-e-Mohammed terror camp in Balakot on February 26 following the February 14 Pulwama terror attack in which 40 CRPF personnel were killed.Four civilians, including three members of a family, were killed and several others injured as Pakistan targeted over 80 villages in more than 100 incidents of ceasefire violations along the LoC in the state since then.The frequent ceasefire violations have caused panic among the border residents, forcing authorities to close down educational institutions within five km radius from the zero line in the twin districts of Poonch and Rajouri as a precautionary measure.However, most schools reopened a few days back after the intensity of the cross-border firing decreased.last_img read more

first_imgLucknow: Opposition Samajwadi Party Monday urged the Election Commission to remove Uttar Pradesh’s police chief OP Singh from the post alleging he was “favouring” the ruling BJP and affecting elections.The party also alleged that in at least two polling booths the VVPAT machine showed the voting for the BJP when the ballot was cast for the SP. SP chief Akhilesh Yadav’s wife Dimple is contesting from the constituency. Party leader Dharmendra Yadav said the DGP was “misusing” government machinery to help the BJP. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework”We demanded from the EC to remove him immediately,” Yadav told reporters here. He was part of an SP delegation that met CEO L Venkatenshwar Lu and submitted a memorandum demanding the immediate removal of the DGP. It highlighted the issue of “faulty” EVMs. “The police are terrorising minority voters. The force is being misused in favour of the BJP. We have apprised the CEO about it,” SP spokesman Rajendra Chowdhury said.last_img read more