first_imgBahamian political leaders share Christmas table. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… The Bahamas PM and Opposition Leader tour areas hit by Hurricane Joaquin  Prime Minister of The Bahamas Rt. Hon. Perry Christie; Leader of the Opposition Hon. Dr. Hubert A. Minnis, the Minister of Tourism and other officials travelled to Long Island on Saturday to assess the impact of Hurricane Joaquin. Initial reports say the island was badly affected by sea surges…October 4, 2015In “The Bahamas”Integration: Delivered or Denied – Prime Minister AnthonySt. Lucia’s Prime Minister Hon. Dr. Kenny Anthony on Tuesday delivered a “Distinguished Open Lecture” on the topic, “Delivered or Denied: The Dividends of Integration” at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus. The lecture was a part of UWI St. Augustine’s CARICOM Leaders Lecture Series, focusing on…March 5, 2015In “CARICOM”The Bahamas, CDB fund College of The Bahamas transformation project    Nassau, THE BAHAMAS – Aimed at strengthening the institution in key areas that will undergird the future University of The Bahamas, The College of The Bahamas Transformation Project was launched on Wednesday, March 4th during a special ceremony held at the Harry C. Moore Library and Information Centre.[su_pullquote…March 10, 2015In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsAppcenter_img L-R: Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Perry G. Christie; Speaker of the House of Assembly the Hon. Dr. Kendal Major; President of the Senate, Senator the Hon. Sharon Wilson; and Leader of the Opposition the Hon. Dr. Hubert MinnisThe occasion was the annual Parliamentarians Christmas Luncheon, held after the last sitting of Parliament for the year, 18 December. (Photo via Bahamas Information Services).last_img read more

first_img[su_pullquote align=”right”]“Britain needs to be brought to the table to discuss the process of reparation, and if we can take this conversation to the higher level and make these demands… then these should become the basis of a summit.” – Professor Hilary Beckles[/su_pullquote]Vice Chancellor, University of the West Indies, Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, has renewed the call for reparations valuing £76 billion be paid to the descendants of enslaved people of the Caribbean by former European slave-trading nation, Britain. “The £20 million that they paid to the slave owners should have been paid to the enslaved. We have to make a claim to that money. We have an entitlement to that £20 million that was paid in 1834 (which) today values £76 billion,” he said. Professor Beckles made the call while speaking on the topic ‘Faked Emancipation, Insincere Independence, Reparatory Justice: A 21st Century Paradigm for Economic Growth’ at a symposium held at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge, University of the West Indies, on October 11. Observation of Emancipation Period Combines Commemoration,… ‘The Wehby Report’ Distributed to CWI Stakeholders The Professor, who is also Chair of the CARICOM Reparation Commission, further suggested that the Caribbean’s bilateral debt should be offset against the £76 billion. Read more at: Jamaica Information Service  Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… The UWI, University of St Martin Sign MOU, Marking Historic… UWI Vice Chancellor Says Caribbean in Need of Special,… Aug 17, 2020center_img Aug 1, 2020 Oct 12, 2020 Sep 11, 2020 You may be interested in… Slavery loan wasn’t fully repaid by Britain until 2015 – CARICOM Reparations Chair  A loan that was taken by the British Government to pay slave owners for the abolition of slavery in 1834 was not fully repaid until 2015. This disclosure was made by Vice-Chancellor of The UWI and Chair of the CARICOM Reparations Commission, Sir Hilary Beckles at a press conference hosted at the University of…February 22, 2018In “Antigua & Barbuda”Emancipation remains a work in progress – Chair of CARICOM Reparations CommissionEmancipation Day Message by Dr. Hilary Beckles, Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission We join annually with communities across the world in marking the moment in which the crime of chattel enslavement was confronted and uprooted from our existential realities. For us, the moment is August 1st; other dates are…August 1, 2018In “CARICOM”Beckles calls for High-Level International Reparations SummitProf. Sir Hilary Beckles, Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC), is calling for a reparations summit involving the governments of the Caribbean and of Europe and with representatives of their private corporations, universities and civil society organisations, to discuss their contributions to a development plan for the Caribbean. The…July 9, 2020In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

first_img ‘Step In our Shoes’ – Dr. Carla Barnett Sep 10, 2020 NASA Features Belizean Scientist, Emil Cherrington and… You may be interested in… Warnings of high surf, large waves, rip currents and floods have been issued several Member States, but there is no tsunami alert for the Region, contrary to information that has been circulating that some 30 countries are on tsunami alert following a large earthquake in Costa Rica. High tides and unusually large waves were also registered in Barbados, The Bahamas and Dominica. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Make COVID Recovery ‘a true turning point’ for people and… Sep 4, 2020center_img Greater Focus on Regional Agriculture Over the past few weeks, the Caribbean has been experiencing unusually high tides, massive waves, flooding and coastal erosion. Even as preparations are underway for the upcoming hurricane season that is predicted to be another active one, concern is high across the Region at the manifestation of the changing climate. Late February, coastal erosion resulted in the collapse of about 18 000 square metres, the destruction of homes and the evacuation of families in Cedros, a seaside area in Trinidad and Tobago. The Trinidad Express in an editorial on 1 March, 2018, said that there were reports that waves from the sea were climbing higher, pounding the shore, and causing severe undermining. In Guyana last week, unusually large waves slammed the sea defence along the West Coast of Demerara, and caused heavy flooding in surrounding areas. Reflections on Climate Resilience in the Caribbean and indications for innovative Approaches(Global Frontier Advisory and Development Services (GOFAD), 13 September) The Bahamas tragedy following the devastating effects of Hurricane Dorian has brought into stark reality the unrelenting havoc that natural disasters have wreaked on the Caribbean Region in recent years.  The  Special Report on Climate Change and Land ( SRCCL) from…September 18, 2019In “Indepth”UPDATE on Hurricane Dorian and The Bahamas Tragedy(GOFAD, 6 September 2019) Since this Blog was written on Tuesday September 3, the death toll has risen to 30 and the extend of the damage is captured in the video link below . According to Dr Duane Sands , Minister of Health the mortality rate is likely to be…September 9, 2019In “Features”Stakes high for CARICOM at COP21(CARICOM Secretariat, Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown, Guyana)     “Unless we can get the countries that are the major emitters of green house gases to commit to more ambitious reductions, the Caribbean will be confronted with more extreme storms and hurricanes, more frequent and prolonged droughts, dangerous sea-level rise that will wash away…November 28, 2015In “Anguilla”Share this on WhatsApp Oct 7, 2020 Sep 3, 2020last_img read more

first_img OECS Commission to start using Facebook’s Disaster Maps… COVID-19 Brings New Pollution Challenge Jun 7, 2019 The June Sargassum invasion in Barbados claimed the lives of three sea turtles, six dolphins, and “countless” fish and eels, The Daily Nation reported. But surely more have perished in the months since, as sheets of the bulbous-tipped seaweed—sometimes several feet deep—have become regular visitors to the country’s eastern and southern shorelines. “We’ve had mass mortality of sea turtles that have gotten trapped under ever-thickening piles,” said Hazel Oxenford, a Barbados-based fisheries biologist at the University of the West Indies. “When the turtles try to come up for air, they drown.” Because these Sargassum beachings are primarily happening during nesting season, which runs from March until the end of October, baby turtles attempting to crawl from their eggs toward the ocean are also getting caught in it. Read more at: New Republic Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… (New Republic) “Beach, eat, drink, dance, repeat.” These are Rihanna’s favorite things to do in Barbados. In a June 7 interview with Conde Nast Traveller, the pop star gushed over her home country, a small island nation in the middle of the Caribbean. “When I’m in Barbados, all is right with the world,” she said. But not all was right with Barbados. The same day, the local The Daily Nation newspaper reported on an “invasion of the Sargassum seaweed”—a brown, leafy algae that had washed up in thick mats on the white-sand beaches of the island’s eastern shores. The next day, the country’s government declared it a national emergency. Seen from afar, the bloom looked like a coppery oil spill slicking the sea. But a closer look revealed dead wildlife entangled within it. CDB President wants faster transformation for a prosperous,… Jun 7, 2019 Related Posts Jun 19, 2020 Massive seaweed infestations are killing sea turtles and befouling beaches across the Caribbean—and scientists say it’s just the beginning. Mysterious masses of seaweed assault Caribbean islandsIn retrospect, 2011 was just the first wave. That year, massive rafts of Sargassum—a brown seaweed that lives in the open ocean—washed up on beaches across the Caribbean, trapping sea turtles and filling the air with the stench of rotting eggs. “It presented immense challenges,” says Hazel Oxenford, a fisheries biologist…June 20, 2018In “Caribbean Tourism Organisation”Sargassum an ‘unwelcome visitor’ – CTOThe Caribbean Tourism Organisation (CTO) on Tuesday described Sargassum – which has been invading Caribbean beaches recently – as an “unwelcome visitor” which was “taking away from the beach experience for our guests”. In a statement, the tourism organisation said that it was treating the matter seriously and with urgency and…August 11, 2015In “Antigua & Barbuda”Tobago House of Assembly leader wants Regional summit on sargassumSCARBOROUGH, Tobago, Aug 4, CMC – Faced with a number of hotel cancellations, the Chief Secretary of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) Orville London is calling for an emergency meeting of Caribbean leaders to discuss the sargassum seaweed invasion across the region. “We are going to approach the national…August 4, 2015In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

first_imgThe developed countries and some beneficiaries among developing countries continued to push for deepening globalisation and liberalisation ignoring the appeals of developing countries. They supported China’s WTO membership, as it was seen as a large, lucrative market and a source of cheap goods and labour. They forced through the launch of the WTO Doha Round of trade negotiations in 2001 under the pretext that it would be a development round. When it did not bring the desired results to secure increased access into the markets of developing countries and regulate new areas, they turned to negotiating even more complex free trade agreements outside of the WTO. They ensured that the world became more integrated further entrenching globalisation. Then came 2009 and the great financial collapse (the Great Recession) originating in the USA. It was the worst global recession since the 1930s Great Depression. It has taken several years for countries, including Jamaica, to dig themselves out of this economic crisis. Then came 2016 and the British voted by a narrow margin in a referendum to leave the European Union. This Brexit was fuelled by concerns about loss of sovereignty, jobs and migration. Britain is currently in a quagmire. In the USA, Donald Trump, with support in states hurting from the decline in manufacturing and other industries, won the presidential election. He promised to bring back jobs and to “make America great again”. Suddenly, these developed countries recognised that globalisation had resulted in inequalities and social discontent within their own countries. For Trump, the free trade agreements initiated and supported by his own Republican Party became the worse agreements ever; with America, the champion and beneficiary of globalisation and liberalisation, the victim. Now, he seem set to disrupt the post-war world order and has declared himself a nationalist. Ultra-conservative nationalist groups have gained prominence in the EU (Italy, Hungary, Poland, Austria, Germany, France) due to anxiety about sovereignty, migration, and economic instability. Brazil, seen as a globalisation beneficiary with great development potential, has faced recession and corruption scandals. Brazil has just elected an ultra-conservative president. So, here we are wondering whether the tide of globalisation can be stemmed after years of ignoring lessons of history and the concerns of developing countries and organisations such as UNCTAD, UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the South Centre, Third World Network, and other bodies and individuals from developing countries. Self-interests often make countries and their transnational corporations, and even institutions, blind and deaf to the concerns of others until they are directly impacted themselves. Then the villains become other countries and peoples. What a world! CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 SMEs Urged To Leverage CARIFORUM-EU EPA(Barbados Government Information Service Press Release) Minister in the Ministry of Foreign Trade of Barbados, Sandra Husbands, has urged small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to consider exporting to Martinique, Guadeloupe and other regional territories that have access to the European market. She was speaking at a regional workshop entitled Leveraging…June 25, 2019In “Associate Member States”Hub and Spokes Programme: providing critical Trade Support to Caribbean economiesGeorgetown, Guyana (April 23, 2018) – Caribbean development partners and beneficiaries of the Hub and Spokes Programme, an aid-for-trade initiative, began a three-day regional planning workshop (April 23 – 25), with appreciation of the programmes tangible impact on the ground. The workshop is being held at the Guyana Marriott Hotel…April 24, 2018In “CARICOM”Jamaica: 25 years at WTO [Part I]By Elizabeth Morgan Twenty-five (25) years ago, Jamaica formally became a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) on 9th March 1995. The independent international organization, the WTO, superseded the United Nations (UN) affiliated General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) on 1st January 1995. Prior to this, Jamaica was…March 10, 2020In “Indepth”Share this on WhatsApp Oct 16, 2020 BY ELIZABETH MORGAN The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and other organisations have defined globalisation as the dynamic and multidimensional integration of global economies through increasing international trade in goods and services and flows in investment and finance. These are fuelled by policy reforms and advances in information, communications and technology, as well as transportation. Globalisation has also facilitated the movement of labour, legal and illegal. It works along with liberalisation, which enables the opening of markets through removal of barriers to trade (tariff and non-tariff measures) and deregulation in the financial sector. Players include countries and transnational corporations, as well as multilateral organisations. Today, a product can have components produced in several countries through the global value chains which mean that the various stages of production and distribution take place in different countries. Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols You may be interested in… Oct 15, 2020 Over 15 years or more Jamaica continued to join other developing countries at the UNGA, the WTO, UNCTAD, and in other international fora to express concern about the inequalities inherent in globalisation and liberalisation, especially if developing countries could not speedily put in place necessary reforms and access financing. Oct 16, 2020 Elizabeth Morgan is a specialist in international trade and politics. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Professor Deepak Nayyar, in his 1998 essay ‘Globalisation: The past in our present’, pointed out that globalisation is not new. It actually accelerated between 1870 and 1913, the period of laissez faire (free trade). Nayyar stated that the lesson from history shows uneven development. He warned that globalisation in the later part of the 20th century demonstrated many similarities to that of the 19th century and was bound to produce uneven development not only between countries but within countries. He pointed out that in the late 20th century the few developing countries benefiting from globalisation were Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. All other developing countries were seeing minimal, if any benefit. He saw the economic distance between countries increasing and income disparities among peoples widening. In their national interests, developed countries began to press for a further acceleration in globalisation from the 1980s onward. Liberalisation of trade was accelerated through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) Uruguay Round (UR) of multilateral trade negotiations, which concluded in 1994. The GATT UR resulted in improved market access through reduction of barriers to trade and brought new areas under regulation such as trade in services, agriculture, textiles and clothing, and trade-related intellectual property rights (TRIPS). It also resulted in the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) outside of the UN system. Before the UR agreements could be implemented there was a further proposal to increase market access which led to a call for a new round of multilateral trade negotiations covering more new issues such as investment, competition, environment. and core labour standards. When this proposal encountered opposition the proponents moved to accelerate negotiation of bilateral and plurilateral free trade agreements with greater levels of liberalisation. Deregulation of the international financial system was also expanded. Liberalisation and deregulation for a number of developing countries, including Jamaica, however, occurred due to their acceptance of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank structural adjustment programmes. Liberalisation of Jamaica’s economy was thus unilateral and occurred in the 1980s. A 1999 paper sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, concluded that developing countries faced special risks that globalisation would exacerbate inequality in the coming decades, raising the political costs of inequality and the social tensions associated with it. It went on to say that a protectionist and populist backlash would be a shame as in a perverse twist, it would undermine the benefits that more open and globally integrated economies and policies could deliver to the peoples of the developing world. Since the 1990s, developing countries, including Jamaica, have been expressing their serious concern about the uncritical embrace of globalisation and liberalisation specifically by the developed countries, the USA, European Union (EU), other members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the International Financial Institutions. In Jamaica’s 1998 policy statement at the UN General Assembly (UNGA), Seymour Mullings, then deputy prime minister and minister of foreign affairs and foreign trade, stated, “The reality is that the globalisation process is heightening patterns of uneven development among developed and developing countries and it is already very clear that there is no globalisation of benefits.” In 2008, then Prime Minister Bruce Golding, speaking on globalisation and the plight of developing countries, told the UNGA that solving the problems of developing countries required more than mere liberalisation of trade, privatisation and free capital flows. The focus, he indicated, had to be on global development, addressing limitations bedevilling developing countries, and not just on increasing global market access.last_img read more

first_img Jan 20, 2020 You may be interested in… CARICOM, Japan strengthen decades-old tiesThe long-standing friendship that has existed between the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and Japan was strengthened on Thursday 25 February, with the accreditation of new Ambassador of Japan to CARICOM, His Excellency Mitsuhiko Okada. Since 1993, relations between CARICOM and Japan have been moving apace. There have been a Summit of…February 26, 2016In “CARICOM”CARICOM, Japan hold Joint Consultation in GeorgetownRepresentatives of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States and Japan met at the CARICOM Secretariat in Georgetown, Guyana on Tuesday 14 March. The two sides met for the 18th CARICOM-Japan Consultation which reviewed ongoing and planned development cooperation projects funded under the CARICOM-Japan Friendship and Cooperation Fund. The Consultation provided the opportunity…March 16, 2017In “CARICOM”CARICOM Secretariat building on course for full solar power generationPlans are advancing for the Headquarters of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat to be fully powered by solar energy by the end of 2020. Commencing next February, installation of a photo voltaic system as well as an energy management mechanism will begin at the CARICOM Secretariat’s Headquarters in Georgetown, Guyana.…July 19, 2019In “Associate Member States”Share this on WhatsApp CARICOM extends sympathy to Japan as it recovers from… CARICOM Secretariat launches solar project for… Mar 16, 2017 Sep 30, 2016 CARICOM, Japan hold Joint Consultation in Georgetown As the Caribbean Community continues to strengthen cooperation with Japan, Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque on Wednesday met with Japanese Ambassador to CARICOM HE Mr Mitsuhiko Okada.  The Secretary-General was joined at the meeting by Assistant Secretary-General, Foreign and Community Relations Ambassador Colin Granderson and other Secretariat officials.  Ambassador Okada was accompanied by Mrs Mari Okada and First Secretary Ms Chiharu Hoshiai.  The meeting was held at the Headquarters of the CARICOM Secretariat, Georgetown, Guyana. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 25, 2019 CARICOM records productive engagements at UNGA last_img read more

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement TROY, MI — ArvinMeritor has promoted Donald Polk to the position of vice president and general manager of its Light Vehicle Systems (LVS) business group’s Wheels product line, effective immediately. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Before being named to this new position, Polk was vice president and general manager of the LVS Ride Control product line. Polk began his career with the company as a Wheels sales engineer in 1989. He has held a number of management and leadership positions since then, including service as director of operations for the Wheels business, which is headquartered in Limeira, Brazil, and general manager of Motion Control Systems in Marion, SC. In his new position, Polk will be responsible for the global leadership of the LVS Wheels business, including directing its business strategy; developing and marketing new products; and ensuring optimum product quality and performance from the manufacturing operations. For more information about ArvinMeritor, visit: www.arvinmeritor.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

first_imgFrom NewsRx.com AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementMILWAUKEE — About 1,200 retirees of Milwaukee’s Tower Automotive plant who opt to keep their current medical coverage will see their monthly health insurance premiums quadruple, or more. Premiums for some of the retirees have increased to more than $1,000 a month. Company officials say skyrocketing healthcare costs have given them no choice but to raise the premiums. Tower Automotive recently sent notices to the retirees telling them of the increase. Smith Steel Workers Local 19806 plans to file a grievance over the matter, union president Duane McConville said. Retirees and the company already are in mediation to resolve a federal court lawsuit challenging changes the company previously made to the retiree health insurance plan. The premiums increase affects 1,200 workers who retired from Tower’s Milwaukee plant since January 1998, according to the Novi, Mich., company. “While we recognize that the size of their premium increase is substantial, it reflects the considerable and ever-increasing cost of retiree health benefits,” company spokesperson Bev Pierce said. Copyright 2004 Health Business Week via IncRx.com _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LYON STATION, PA — East Penn Manufacturing Co. recently announced the promotion of Donna Snyder from advertising manager to the director of marketing and advertising. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement In addition to continuing to direct East Penn’s advertising department, Snyder will be responsible for developing and implementing marketing programs and strategies for the company and its customers in all divisions. Snyder joined East Penn in 1983 as an advertising artist. Since then she has been promoted to assistant advertising manager and advertising manager. For more information about East Penn Manufacturing, go to: www.dekabatteries.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit. last_img read more

first_imgCYPRESS, Calif. – Toyo Tire U.S.A. Corp. has named Amy Coleman as its new senior director of marketing. She is responsible for leading all aspects of the company’s marketing, focusing on business growth while enhancing brand equity and awareness. The department includes advertising, sales promotions, communications, web initiatives, dealer support, sponsorships and events.   Coleman has an extensive marketing background in the automotive industry. She recently served as director of marketing for Fleetwood RV Inc., working in the marketing department for the Fleetwood brand for more than 15 years. During her tenure with the company, Coleman led a wide range of marketing initiatives that helped make it one of the most widely acknowledged recreational vehicle brands in the world.   “This is an exciting time to be a member of the Toyo Tires team as we expand our marketing initiatives into new areas,” said Coleman. “I look forward working with Toyo Tires’ outstanding independent dealer network to further elevate the Toyo brand and to grow our mutual businesses.”   “I am pleased to welcome Amy Coleman as our newest member of the Toyo Tires team,” added Marty Furman, chief operating officer, Toyo Tire U.S.A. Corp. “Amy is highly respected for her success in marketing world-class brands. I look forward to her insight and her future contributions.”   Coleman received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Stephens College in Columbia, Mo.   AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more