上海龙凤1314最新地址

first_imgHenry Finney was transported, via ambulance, to King’s Daughters’ Hospital in Madison where he succumbed to his injuries.  Shannon Hubbard was also transported, via ambulance, to King’s Daughters’ Hospital.  Ms. Hubbard was then transported, via lifeline helicopter, to The University of Cincinnati Hospital.  Ms. Hubbard was in serious but stable condition. It is believed that both drivers were wearing their seatbelts.  Drugs and or alcohol are not believed to be a contributing factor to the crash.  Improper passing and traveling at a high rate of speed are believed to be contributing factors to the crash.The investigation is ongoing and toxicology results are pending at this time.Trooper Garrett was assisted at the scene by the Ripley County Sheriff’s Department, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, Ripley County EMS, King’s Daughters’ Hospital EMS, Versailles Fire Department, and Affordable Todd’s Wrecker Service. A two-vehicle crash occurred in Ripley County near Versailles on US 421.On June 14, 2019, at approximately 3:30 pm an Indiana State Police Crash Reconstructionist responded to a report on an injury crash involving two vehicles on US 421 south of County Road 1050 South in Ripley County. Trooper Andrew Garrett arrived to find a 2016 Kia Soul and a 2019 Mitsubishi Mirage in the east ditch of US 421.  The preliminary investigation by Garrett shows that the Kia Soul was traveling southbound and was attempting to pass another vehicle.  The Kia Soul was driven by Shannon Hubbard, age 50 of Pekin Indiana.  The Mitsubishi Mirage was traveling northbound and could not avoid a collision with the Kia Soul, which was in the northbound lane.  The Mitsubishi Mirage was driven by Henry Finney, age 21 of Madison Indiana. last_img read more

first_imgMost people are aware of the need for captions to make videos more accessible. But few are familiar with the requirement for audio description for videos, which accommodates people who are blind or have low-vision. Audio description narrates what visually is happening in the video, information that’s not available to someone who can’t see. Think of a radio sports announcer at a baseball game, describing the ground ball hit to the third baseman who throws the ball to the second baseman for the beginning of a double play. That’s similar to audio description. Intro to Audio Description for VideosOn Thursday, January 17, 2019, you can learn more about video audio description when 3Play Media hosts their free Intro to Audio Description webinar at 2:00pm Eastern Time. In the one-hour webinar, Sofia Leivaf from 3Play Media, will highlight the basics of audio description:What is audio description?How to add audio description to online videoVideo player compatibility: which players support itLegal requirements: accessibility laws and complianceHow to create and publish it on your ownDifference between standard and extended audio descriptionWhat tools and features can make it easier to produce audio descriptionAfter the presentation, Leiva will take answer questions from webinar attendees.Who is the Audience for the Webinar?Anyone looking to make their videos more accessible, and those taking the next step beyond captioning their videos, will find useful information and help from the webinar. Wrapping UpIncluding audio description with your captioned video will make your video content more accessible; you’ll reach a wider audience. The free 3Play Media webinar will provide the background and knowledge you need to move forward and add audio descriptions to your videos. I hope you’ll join me on Thursday, January 17, 2019 and register for the free 3Play Media webinar. I’ll be live tweeting during the webinar!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedKey Takeaways from HTML5 Video AccessibilityLast week I attended the HTML5 Video Accessibility: Updates, Features & Guidelines webinar from 3Play Media. Guest speaker John Foliot, W3C contributor and accessibility expert at Deque Systems, discussed guidelines for making videos accessible and shared his tips and insights on HTML5 video. Check out the recording of the webinar…In “Accessibility”Free Webinar: Planning and Producing Accessible Videos for Web, Social Media, and eLearningYou’re invited to the Great Lakes Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center free webinar on July 20, 2017, focusing on planning and producing accessible video. The Planning and Producing Accessible Videos for Web, Social Media, and eLearning webinar will teach you the key components needed to produce videos that are…In “Accessibility”DescribeAthon17: Make Video on YouTube More AccessibleI invite you to join me tomorrow, January 26, 2017 at DescribeAthon17 when amateur and professional describers around the world will join together to add audio descriptions to YouTube videos. Working from your home, business, or wherever you have a connection to the Internet, you’ll be part of a group…In “Accessibility”last_img read more

first_imgAll aboard for education. Professor Isabel Hofmeyr in discussionwith a commuter on a train to Soweto.Sermon on a Train encourages dialoguebetween the lecturer and the audience.(Images: Sermon on the Train)MEDIA CONTACTS• Molemo MoiloaSermon on the Train+27 84 892 0610RELATED ARTICLES• SA university puts lectures online• South African academics shine• University honour for Tutu• Education in South AfricaNosimilo NdlovuSowetan commuters are being given a taste of university education, with top South African academics giving free lectures on trains as part of the Sermon on the Train art project.The initiative takes up the old South African tradition of public preaching on trains in a different way, and aims to challenge the concept the “public lecture”.Final-year fine arts students Molemo Moiloa and Nare Mokgotho from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) in central Johannesburg started the project in early 2009 with academics from the university. The idea was that, while universities do occasionally give lectures open to the general public, these are not public enough.“Ordinary members of the public do not form part of the group of individuals that attend university public lectures,” said Mokgotho. “Hence, the sermon seeks to bring an exchange between the creative community and greater society.”Moiloa said Sermon on the Train began as a once-off art project for their degree. “Since then the project has taken on a life of its own,” she said. “Though we are still graded on the project, it has a greater public significance that has become separate to our degrees.”The sermons take place in the late afternoon, targeting workers returning home from work. They begin at Park Station in the city centre, where commuters board the train, and end in Soweto in the southwest of Johannesburg. Audiences are encouraged to ask questions and discuss issues with the lecturer, creating the opportunity for dialogue and the exchange of knowledge.The project kicked off in March, with the first lecture was given by Professor Anitra Nettleton, head of History of Art at Wits. On a train trip to Dube in Soweto, she spoke on the topic “Meditations on the African Avant Garde”.“The sermons serve as a critique of public access to information and the isolation and elitism often endemic in tertiary institution – particularly in relation to ordinary members of the public,” said Moiloa.All on boardThe first sermon was well received by the audience, to the relief of the organisers and lecturer. Soon other academics approached Moiloa and Nare Mokgotho, offering to do sermons.The second sermon was delivered by Wits architecture lecturer Professor Kirsten Doermann on a train to Orlando Station in Soweto in August. She read from a lecture by the radical avant-garde Greek architect Elia Zenghelis, dealing with democracy, urbanisation, globalisation and the role of the architect.Despite the seemingly daunting topic, the sermon set off critical discussion between the students, lecturers and commuters, confirming Moiloa and Mokgotho’s view that the initiative would encourage dialogue.In October award-winning writer and academic Professor Isabel Hofmeyr from the Wits School of Literature and Language Studies presented the third sermon, called “Revelations”, on the train to Phomolong, Soweto.Discussing African and Indian literature, Hofmeyr spoke of the birth of a new world power order, with the Indian Ocean as the central point of orientation. She handed out printed copies of the sermon to all commuters, which many read from top to bottom.Bridging social gapsMokgotho said their art had been about “re-observation and the defamiliarisation” of the everyday – questioning the way people saw the world and finding the aesthetic in the simple.More than this, according to the students, Sermon on the Train aims to raise questions about access, social divisions and the stereotypes that get entrenched by keeping people separate. The work also chips away at the hierarchy that separates students from lectures by encouraging lecturer-student collaborations.The university continues to provide resources to allow the project to grow further. “We have received major support,” Moiloa. “The university has sponsored the last two sermons because they feel it makes strides in some of the objectives of the university itself. This has resulted in a workshop and tutorial information packs we give out on the trains.”Some have argued that having a public lecture in a public space is imposing on that public. But Moiloa and Mokgotho believe it is no different to other performances such as public preaching, and are set to continue their journey.last_img read more

first_imgSo am I contributing to the problem of over simplifying security? Or am I reaching out to those who might not take an inordinate amount of time necessary to understand the complexities and nuances of our industry? You decide and feel free to share your knowledge-nuggets. Everyone wants information security to be easy. Wouldn’t it be nice if it were simple enough to fit snugly inside a fortune cookie? Well, although I don’t try to promote such foolish nonsense, I do on occasion pass on readily digestible nuggets to reinforce security principles and get people thinking how security applies to their environment. Common SenseI think the key to fortune cookie advice is ‘common sense’ in the context of security. It must be simple, succinct, and make sense to everyone, while conveying important security aspects.Fortune Cookie advice for December:Be mindful of the security message you deliver to your customers and how it is interpretedRallying your populace to be security savvy is a worthwhile investment and must be approached with the appropriate diligence. It is not enough to haphazardly deliver security information and walk away. If it is perceived as ‘junk-mail’, it will be treated as such. Information security must be understood and applied in order to make a difference. This embrace will only occur if the audience understands not only the message, but also why it is important and the overall context. Every good communication program draws in the audience by letting them know how it applies and benefits them.If we want to be successful, we have an obligation to understand what is being absorbed and how it is being interpreted.Andy, ITGuy has a great post (check out the picture for a good laugh).“How we communicate our security plans has to be in a way that the user will understand and that will make them want to work with us”.  This is key, as ultimately it is a partnership between dedicated security folks and the organization they protect.Additionally, Mike Rothman has some great follow-up comments which I think nails the right perspective:“effective communication is based upon the perception of the person on the other end”. Sounds basic, but how often do we ignore this fundamental principle in our rush to deliver our message?If you are interested in good security insights, consider subscribing to Andy,ITGuy and Mike Rothman’s blogs. They mix perspective, humor, to timely issues.center_img Fortune Cookie Security Advice – November 2008Fortune Cookie Security Advice – September 2008Fortune Cookie Security Advice – August 2008Fortune Cookie Security Advice – June 2008Fortune Cookie Security Advice – May 2008last_img read more